Reached Kingstown, and found my mother there in good health. Went to Mr Telford, whose premises were full of the elements of the organ, the wood-work of which had gone night to empty them. Settled with him, during my stay in Ireland, to introduce some changes and several additions, so that now it will be as near perfect as need be. He still hopes to have it ready by the 1st of November, though some of the pedal pipes may have to be omitted for the present. Mr de la Motte’s plan of the front was so full of blunders, that he got a young artist in Dublin, a Mr Price, to draw one out, and certainly he has produced something far superior to it. However, so erroneous was the former that Mr Price (who was obliged to follow it to a great extent) is now employed upon a fresh one. Just before I left Ireland, I settled upon the final plan and details of the front. The centre pipe will be 20 feet long, (including the leg,) and will be made of pure tin without alloy, and look like silver. We anticipate a very fine tone from this metal, – but these large pipes will cost a great deal of money. They are usually now made of zinc, and therefore light, and cheap. But zinc is an ugly metal, and we will not have any gilding: so we are driven to tin and expense. Tin is now £120 a ton.

I found the Irish newspapers devoted to our injury. The Meath Herald on the authority of the Church and State Gazette assumed that the College of St Columba was forthwith to be removed to the more genial atmosphere of Oxford, and therefore thought fit to rejoice. Saunders News-Letter copied the triumphs of the Meath Herald into its columns, and in a day or two announced ‘on authority’ that ‘Mr Singleton was not its Warden and that it had no connection whatsoever with Mr Sewell, or with his plans, whatever they may be.’ How grateful ‘authority’ is to those who devoted themselves, body, mind and purse to found it!

Here I cannot help setting down an incident which occurred after my return to England. On Sunday July 11th, Sewell and I were walking up and down the terrace walk, which he had got made, during my absence, at the south front of the house. The unfortunate martens, who had been dispossessed from their quiet retreats in the angles of the Windows, had made fresh ones in the great projecting Cornice traversing the top of the house. Near one of these which had been lately completed, sat a cock-sparrow, the picture of impudence. I knew very well by the airs he had put on him, and from an observation of the dishonest and burglarious principles of his species, that he had driven away the builders of the nest from their rightful property and their home. I therefore said, – ‘Sewell, I can set no bounds to my indignation against that rogue of a bird up there. He would not take the trouble of making a nest for himself, but has secured a comfortable berth without labour, by sacrificing the helpless and innocent. It is the triumph of vulgar force against gentility and justice.’ To which Sewell replied, – ‘My dear Singleton, that sparrow must evidently be a Trustee.’

To return. When the Meath Herald found it was misinformed, it sincerely lamented that the obnoxious College was not to be removed to England, for that, though Messrs Sewell and Singleton had nothing to do with it, they had no confidence in such a Puseyite place. This was the sense of their remarks, so that, as we said from the very first, their abandonment of their principles at Stackallan only had the effect of cooling or alienating their friends, without the softening or gaining over one enemy.

While at Kingstown, Sewell sent me a copy of an admirable letter that he had written to the Archbishop of Armagh, proving by reference to documents and fact, that I could not have actetd otherwise than I had done about the discipline of fasting, and that it was notorious and past dispute that I had always relaxed, rather than pressed, the Founders’ Rule on the Subject. To this His Grace subsequently replied, without the smallest effort to disprove or weaken what had been urged, that ‘the opinion which he expressed in his former letter remained unaltered.’ Surely this is hard usage.

I met Dr Elrington one day by accident in Grant & Bolton’s shop. I immediately went up to him and we were quite friendly. I afterwards called at his house, but he was examining in Trinity College. However I sat some time with his Sister, Miss Elrington. I was at St Patrick’s one Sunday afternoon, and Dr Todd preached. I could not bear to turn my face towards him, so I heard but saw him not. On another occasion I was at Grant & Bolton’s, when Gabbett came in, but of him I would take no notice. He was one of the main promoter’s of St Columba’s ruin, just as sister ‘Flavie’ was of that of Port Royal. I believe, however, that he and all his co-partners were extremely sorry for what they had done, but if the sorrow were of a right sort, he would have repaired the damage caused by a public defamation of the College and its officers, – by an equally public acknowledgement of his error and sin. This he has never done; therefore I cannot make light of such wicked behaviour by amity, thought I heartily forgive him for his bad treatment of oneself.

Received a letter from the Sub-warden to say that on the 10th, immediately after my leaving, Mr Ratcliffe, the Vicar, called upon me. I understand he is softened towards us. The next Sunday, by Sewell’s directions, (it being Holy Communion) the Sub-warden placed upon the offertory plate £5, rolled in a small parcel, on which was written, ‘- From the Warden and Fellows of S Peter’s College for the poor of Radley.’ This will surely show him that we have no design of disturbing his Parochial position, or of embarrassing him in any way with his people.

Soon afterwards got a note from Sewell, saying that we were very likely to have a formal application for a Fellowship from a Mr Jones of Queen’s. He bears a very high character in every way, and is an excellent classic, having taken a 2nd Class, and got the Ireland Scholarship. This is very satisfactory as it shows (what indeed we fully expected) that men of high attainments will be ready to devote themselves to the work.

On leaving Ireland I brought with me a pair of handsome old silver candlesticks, a present from K. to the College, and a dinner drinking cup from F.; both of which pleased Sewell very much. Returned by the Isle of Man, and spent a day with Allen Cliff at Hampton Lacy, reaching the College in the evening of July 5th.

COLLEGE OF ST COLUMBA. – A paragraph appeared in the Warder of Saturday last (copied from the Church and State Gazette) in which it is stated that the Rev. W. Sewell, of Exeter College, Oxford, has taken a house near Abingdon, Berks, within four miles of Oxford, and that ‘St Columba College, with its warden, Mr Singleton, its fellows and whole establishment, is to be forthwith removed to that locality.’ This, we are authorised to state, is not true. The College of St Columba is not concerned in any way with the plans (whatever they may be) which Mr Sewell has in contemplation, nor is it to be moved or removed from Ireland at all. Mr Singleton is not the warden of St Columba College, having resigned from that office a year ago. (Why?) – ‘nor has he or Mr Sewell now any connection whatsoever with the college, which is entirely under the direction and control of his Grace the Primate of Ireland, by whom the present trustees of the College have been appointed.’ Warder

Singleton went to Ireland to help his brother fight for a Parliamentary seat in the General Election of 1847. The diary entries between 12th June and 5th July were written up retrospectively on his return, grouped under the general date and heading June 12th. For the purposes of this online publication they have been split up into their respective dates.

I found the Irish newspapers devoted to our injury. The Meath Herald on the authority of the Church and State Gazette assumed that the College of St Columba was forthwith to be removed to the more genial atmosphere of Oxford, and therefore thought fit to rejoice. Saunders News-Letter copied the triumphs of the Meath Herald into its columns, and in a day or two announced ‘on authority’ that ‘Mr Singleton was not its Warden and that it had no connection whatsoever with Mr Sewell, or with his plans, whatever they may be.’ How grateful ‘authority’ is to those who devoted themselves, body, mind and purse to found it!

When the Meath Herald found it was misinformed, it sincerely lamented that the obnoxious College was not to be removed to England, for that, though Messrs Sewell and Singleton had nothing to do with it, they had no confidence in such a Puseyite place. This was the sense of their remarks, so that, as we said from the very first, their abandonment of their principles at Stackallan only had the effect of cooling or alienating their friends, without the softening or gaining over one enemy.

Singleton went to Ireland to help his brother fight for a Parliamentary seat in the General Election of 1847. The diary entries between 12th June and 5th July were written up retrospectively on his return, grouped under the general date and heading June 12th. For the purposes of this online publication they have been split up into their respective dates.

I met Dr Elrington one day by accident in Grant & Bolton’s shop. I immediately went up to him and we were quite friendly. I afterwards called at his house, but he was examining in Trinity College. However I sat some time with his Sister, Miss Elrington.

I was at St Patrick’s one Sunday afternoon, and Dr Todd preached. I could not bear to turn my face towards him, so I heard but saw him not.

On another occasion I was at Grant & Bolton’s, when Gabbett came in, but of him I would take no notice. He was one of the main promoter’s of St Columba’s ruin, just as sister ‘Flavie’ was of that of Port Royal. I believe, however, that he and all his co-partners were extremely sorry for what they had done, but if the sorrow were of a right sort, he would have repaired the damage caused by a public defamation of the College and its officers, – by an equally public acknowledgement of his error and sin. This he has never done; therefore I cannot make light of such wicked behaviour by amity, thought I heartily forgive him for his bad treatment of oneself.

Singleton went to Ireland to help his brother fight for a Parliamentary seat in the General Election of 1847. The diary entries between 12th June and 5th July were written up retrospectively on his return, grouped under the general date and heading June 12th. For the purposes of this online publication they have been split up into their respective dates.

While at Kingstown, Sewell sent me a copy of an admirable letter that he had written to the Archbishop of Armagh, proving by reference to documents and fact, that I could not have acted otherwise than I had done about the discipline of fasting, and that it was notorious and past dispute that I had always relaxed, rather than pressed, the Founders’ Rule on the Subject. To this His Grace subsequently replied, without the smallest effort to disprove or weaken what had been urged, that ‘the opinion which he expressed in his former letter remained unaltered.’ Surely this is hard usage.

Singleton went to Ireland to help his brother fight for a Parliamentary seat in the General Election of 1847. The diary entries between 12th June and 5th July were written up retrospectively on his return, grouped under the general date and heading June 12th. For the purposes of this online publication they have been split up into their respective dates.

Received a letter from the Sub-warden to say that on the 10th, immediately after my leaving, Mr Ratcliffe, the Vicar, called upon me. I understand he is softened towards us. The next Sunday, by Sewell’s directions, (it being Holy Communion) the Sub-warden placed upon the offertory plate £5, rolled in a small parcel, on which was written, ‘- From the Warden and Fellows of S. Peter’s College for the poor of Radley.’ This will surely show him that we have no design of disturbing his parochial position, or of embarrassing him in any way with his people.

Soon afterwards got a note from Sewell, saying that we were very likely to have a formal application for a Fellowship from a Mr Jones of Queen’s. He bears a very high character in every way, and is an excellent classic, having taken a 2nd Class, and got the Ireland Scholarship. This is very satisfactory as it shows (what indeed we fully expected) that men of high attainments will be ready to devote themselves to the work.

Singleton went to Ireland to help his brother fight for a Parliamentary seat in the General Election of 1847. The diary entries between 12th June and 5th July were written up retrospectively on his return, grouped under the general date and heading June 12th. For the purposes of this online publication they have been split up into their respective dates.

Reached Kingstown, and found my mother there in good health. Went to Mr Telford, whose premises were full of the elements of the organ, the wood-work of which had gone night to empty them. Settled with him, during my stay in Ireland, to introduce some changes and several additions, so that now it will be as near perfect as need be. He still hopes to have it ready by the 1st of November, though some of the pedal pipes may have to be omitted for the present. Mr de la Motte’s plan of the front was so full of blunders, that he got a young artist in Dublin, a Mr Price, to draw one out, and certainly he has produced something far superior to it. However, so erroneous was the former that Mr Price (who was obliged to follow it to a great extent) is now employed upon a fresh one. Just before I left Ireland, I settled upon the final plan and details of the front. The centre pipe will be 20 feet long, (including the leg,) and will be made of pure tin without alloy, and look like silver. We anticipate a very fine tone from this metal, – but these large pipes will cost a great deal of money. They are usually now made of zinc, and therefore light, and cheap. But zinc is an ugly metal, and we will not have any gilding: so we are driven to tin and expense. Tin is now £120 a ton.

A prayer extracted from Bishop Lancelot Andrewes’ Private devotions, with a few alterations and additions, as follows:

Let us kneel down and offer up to Almighty God

An Act of Intercession
for the Catholic Church;
for the Churches throughout the whole world;
that is, for their verity, unity, and stability;
that in all charity may flourish,
and truth be a living principle.

For our Church;
that what is wanting in it may be supplied;
what is unsound, corrected;
that all heresies, schisms, scandals,
as well public as private,
may be removed.

Correct the wandering,
convert the unbelieving,
increase the faith of the Church,
destroy heresies,
expose the crafty enemies,
bruise the violent.

For the Clergy;
and especially for the Bishop of this Diocese;
that they may rightly divide,
that they might rightly walk;
that while they teach others, themselves may learn.

For the people;
that they seek not to be wise above measure;
but may be persuaded by reason,
and yield to the authority of superiors.

For governments;
their stability and peace.
For our Kingdom;
that they may fare well and prosperously,
and be freed from all danger and inconvenience.

For the Queen;
help her now, O Lord,
O Lord, send her now prosperity;
crown her with the array of truth and glory;
speak good things to her heart
for Thy church and People.

For the prudence of her Counsellors;
the equity and integrity of the judges;
the courage of the army;
the temperance of the people,
and their godly simplicity.

For all Universities and Schools;
and, as in this place we are especially required to pray,
for the Universities of Oxford and Dublin;
and for the Colleges of
Exeter, Merton, St Mary Winton,
and St Columba’s in Ireland.

For the rising generation;
and here especially let us pray
for all the little ones of Christ,
who shall be trained up within these walls,
that as they increase in age,
they may also increase in wisdom and in favour
with God and man.

For them that show themselves benevolent,
whether to the Church,
or to the poor and needy;
reward Thou them sevenfold into their bosom;
let their souls dwell at ease;
and their seed inherit the earth;
blessed is he that considereth the needy.

That it may please Thee to reward all out benefactors with eternal blessings.
For the benefits they have bestowed on us upon earth,
let them obtain everlasting rewards in Heaven.
That it may please Thee to behold and relieve
the miseries of the poor and the captives.
That it may please Thee of Thy merciful compassion
to restore the frail lapses of the flesh,
and to strengthen them that are failing.
That it may please Thee graciously to accept
our reasonable service.
That it may please Thee to raise our minds
to heavenly desires.
That it may please Thee to regards us
with the eyes of Thy compassion.
That it may please Thee to enable us
steadfastly and in love
to follow the example of Thy Blessed Apostle St Peter,
and to feed Thy lambs.

That it may please Thee to preserve the souls
of us and our’s
from everlasting damnation.
That it may please Thee to grant unto us,
with those for whom we have prayed,
or for whom we are in any way bound to pray,
and with all the people of God,
an entrance into Thy Kingdom;
there to appear in righteousness,
and to be satisfied with Glory;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

After administering the requisite promise to Captain Haskoll, I formally constituted him Sub-Warden, and left for Ireland. Passed through Gloucester, and called on Hopson to hurry him with the carvings, and to consult him about the stalls, which he was ordered to get ready. It was quite clear that he had not hands enough employed to have 10 or 12 ready by November.

The Ceremony of Installation being ended, I conducted Mrs Acland down to the Common Room, and then went in with Sewell to see how the dinner was arranged, and that all matters were right. We met Mrs Burky in tears, tears of joy. She said that a year ago she had not the remotest expectation of ever being so happy again during her whole life, as she was now; that she never dreamt of being once more the Dame of a College with oneself for its warden, – and that she hoped we would not think that her delight at her present situation would ever lead her to forget her duty.

The table looked charming. Mr Johnston had erected a temporary structure, like broad benches for carpenters’ use. These were arranged in a T shape. To hide the unevenness we put quilts over the planks, and then covered the quilts with our own table cloths, which had just been finished, and looked as white as snow, or as linen possibly can. The dishes were all of cold viands, including some tarts, and blanc-manges. There was abundance, but the table did not groan either literally or metaphorically. Several bowls of flowers were spread about, and gave a gay and finished look to the repast, while our plate added a quiet handsomeness, exactly suited to the sort of College that we want to have. It was greatly admired.

At the head of the table one of the Bristol chairs was placed for the Warden, and on each side were four chairs which had been formerly in Carlton Palace, and had fallen into Mallam’s hands, and from his into ours.

Before we assembled at dinner I implored Sewell not to drink my health, but he was inexorable. He said that it would be expected from him; and that if he did not propose the toast somebody else undoubtedly would; and that the omission would be un-English: so I was compelled to submit. I then told him that I must in that case propose his in return as Founder, but he besought me not to do so so pathetically, that I yielded, and thus showed him more mercy that he showed me. How I do abhor a share in public proceedings; and of all things I tremble at the prospect of having to make a speech.

All matters being now arranged under the superintendence of Hewlett that Common-Room man at Exeter, I took Mrs Acland down, Sewell Miss Richards, and Wade Miss H Richards. When dinner drew toward a close, the beautiful Grace-cup full of some beverage prepared by Hewlitt, was brought to Sewell, who rose and said that it was essential to a College that it should have a ‘Poculum Caritatis’; that he had some years ago caused the one in his hands to be laid by for him, on account of its beauty and suitableness; and that he had always intended it for some College or other, having thought of Exeter and St. Augustine’s, but that he was now happy that it had remained in his possession until the present time; concluding with words to this effect:

I have much pleasure, Mr Warden, in presenting this Grace-cup to the College of St Peter. You may observe that there are brute animals represented on its sides, and that it is crowned by an ancient figure of a Bishop with a crozier in hand, symbolising the universal triumph of religion. May it prove to this College a cup of grace, the type of brotherly love, and the bond of peace and unity.’ Having taken a draught, he handed it to me; upon which I rose and expressed, ‘in behalf of the College, the high value which we placed upon the ancient usages of such Societies, and that we should always feel it a happiness as well as a privilege to imitate them where practicable; returning our best thanks for the handsome gift now offered.

I then took a draught myself, and handed the cup to Miss Richards, who did the same, and then each of the company in turn, who stood up as they drank. What the fluid tasted like I am sure I don’t know. I was in such a fuss that I should have been none the wiser, had it been ink.

After this ensued a short interval, which was not spent in the happiest way imaginable by me, for I knew my fate was now at hand, and felt more as if I was going to be executed than to have my health drank. Accordingly Sewell stood up, and instantly all was silence. He then observed that ‘we had a custom at St Columba’s of never sitting after dinner in Hall or Common Room drinking wine, but that on Saints’ days and on certain other festal occasions, we used to partake moderately of it during dinner, and in very particular instances to drink one toast, and but one. That in accordance with this principle he was now about to propose a toast, which he had no doubt would be responded to unanimously, as it would be anticipated by all. He added some eulogistic remarks, (which in all sincerity, I wholly forget,) and ended by saying: ‘The toast that I have now the pleasure of giving is, – God bless the Warden of St Peter’s’; to which all the company added ‘Amen.’ – This was very painful, and almost past bearing; – but on great occasions excitement seems to furnish unnatural nerve, so I bore it. After bowing in acknowledgement of the salutations on all sides, I rose and spoke briefly; but what I said I’m sure is not worth recording, and I doubt if I could remember it. However, I took occasion to ‘thank those present for the very great kindness and attention which I had received at their hands, and which I said affected me the more as it was shown to a stranger, and wholly free from all appearance of effort.’ Sewell told me afterwards that I had said just enough, and that people were pleased; a comfort proportioned to my apprehension. The whole company then retired, and shortly afterwards quitted the College, very much struck, and very highly pleased, by the proceedings of the day.

I scarcely ever remember to have been more delighted at the termination of any thing, for I was fagged beyond measure. As to Sewell, he lay down on the floor and rested his head against a chair. My head was splitting. He soon became somewhat recovered, and walked into Oxford with Edward Sewell and Nugent Wade. On taking leave of me (for I was to go away the next day,) he said; – ‘What a comfort to send you back to your mother once more a Warden.’

Captain Haskoll and I walked with Monk part of the way into Oxford, but I had such a pain in my head that I could not go far. The glow-worms shone, and the nightingales whistled, as we returned. I managed a hearty supper, of which I stood somewhat in need, having eaten scarcely anything at dinner, I was in such a fuss, though no one could detect any uneasiness. What a great work it is which we have now taken the first formal step; one scarcely dares to think of all the responsibility which we have incurred. What damage to the cause of truth if we should fail: – quod absit!


The first part of this entry is here.